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Whenever I think heads up player I think Doug Polk and his Upswing Poker site. Costs money. Apparently it's a very good course, but then ...


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Poker Players Get Heads-Up In World Series Of Poker Event, Fall In Love, And Get Married
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If you enjoy fierce competition and intense playing sessions, then Heads Up Tournaments are for you.
These unique poker tourneys feature just 2 players per table.
Players battle it out in grueling sessions until one of the players has scooped up all the chips.
Table winners compete against other table winners, playing additional rounds of these poker tournaments until a single champion has been crowned.
Heads Up encounters are the ultimate one-on-one poker challenge, and they are available at 888poker!
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Best Reasons to Play Heads-Up Poker Tournaments Is a Heads-Up Poker Go here right for you?
This is a great way to gain lots of experience with a variety of starting hands.
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Typically, players must wait for other tables to open up before advancing through these tournaments.
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The Big Question: Are Heads-Up Poker Tournaments Right for You?
Do you enjoy playing a wide variety of starting hands?
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The first few articles are slightly basic and will catch new players up with everyone else, but after that we get right into the heads up poker strategy.


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Playing versus an aggressive opponent heads up is extremely annoying.
These players like to constantly apply pressure by raising, 3-betting and pulling off plays like check-raises or bluffs.
These players just don't give who is the best heads up poker player a break.
Many players, myself included, tend to react to this in a negative way.
Instead of trying to figure out a strategy to overcome this opponent, we will be counterproductive in our actions.
An action I've been guilty of taking and I'm sure I'm not alone is becoming frustrated or tilted.
Often times my first response once I reached this point is to fight fire with fire - or aggression who is the best heads up poker player aggression.
The problem with this who is the best heads up poker player often than not is that it https://juegoenelmundo.com/the/the-edgewater-hotel-and-casino.html blind aggression.
We're being aggressive simply for the sake of being aggressive.
In my experience, albeit it's very short, the best approach to facing these players is to remain calm and make tiny adjustments in your strategy.
I prefer to make one adjustment at a time.
A few of these adjustments include how wide I open or defend post flop, my overall bluffing strategy and the thinness https://juegoenelmundo.com/the/what-is-the-oldest-casino-in-las-vegas.html my calls or value bets post flop.
Preflop Adjustments for Aggressive Heads Up Players The adjustment I make for aggressive players is to adapt an opposite style of play.
In other words, I will be more passive and calling station-y.
This is actually common advice to do the opposite of what the other player is doing.
The most popular example of this advice in action is versus a tight opponent.
It's often suggested that versus a tight player you loosen up and steal his or her blinds since they'll only play strong hands.
All other pots are up for grabs.
I take a similar approach when playing against aggressive players.
But the thoughts behind my adjustments vary slightly depending on whether I'm opening or calling defending.
Let me explain further.
When I'm opening versus an aggressive opponent, the first question I ask myself is, "can I call a 3-bet?
I have to expect that he'll 3-bet me often.
If I can't continue to a 3-bet, I'll generally fold my hand or in other words, I'll narrow my opening range.
My range will only include hands I can 4-bet and call 5-bets with or defend to 3-bets with.
All of these hands should more or less be for value.
So my "thought" behind my action here is more or less based on his aggressive tendency.
Defending opens, on the other hand, I actually look at what I perceive my opponent's opening range click here be.
I know if my opponent is aggressive, he's likely to be loose too this is heads up after all.
So, my opponent's range will have a lot of "air" or "bluffs" in it.
My strategy for countering this is to have a wider defending range.
I'm going to defend a lot with raggedy aces, my medium kings and queens.
Again, this is all from a value perspective.
I'm defending with a wider range, but it's still narrower than what I perceive his opening range to be.
Bluff Adjustments for Aggressive Players The bluff adjustment that I make is to avoid bluffing with a high frequency - if I choose to bluff at all.
My reasoning simply boils down to what I outlined previously.
Most of my actions versus an aggressive player are going to be for value.
If I can't withstand a check-raise, 3-bet or shove, who is the best heads up poker player I shouldn't be doing anything that can provoke that action.
I realize that probably sounds extremely passive or even fishy.
But hear me out.
To me, it doesn't make a lot of sense to c-bet a flop if you know that 9 times out of 10 you're going to get check-raised or shoved on.
Most times, because c-bets are bluffs a large portion of who is the best heads up poker player time, you're going to have to fold.
That adds up to a lot of money only to give up.
So instead, I choose to avoid it altogether and come up with an alternative strategy.
Either I'll go for a delayed c-bet c-bet the turn or just check behind since I should expect to have showdown value a majority of the time.
Versus some aggressive players, you might be able to get away with an occasional bluff in the form of a check-raise, c-bet on a super dry board or something to that effect.
As with anything poker related, it's player dependent.
At least it was for me.
A "thin" value bet is making a bet with a hand like second or third pair.
The bet is for "value" because you expect worse to call.
It's thin because there isn't much worse that can call you.
For example, say you have KT on an A-J-T-4-2 board.
You can make a small bet here and get value from a pair of 9s or worse or even king high.
Another good example would be KT on a Th-9h-6c-5h-2d board.
This board is pretty gross with a flush draw, straight draw and a few two pair combos.
But you can still make a bet here and get value from worse tens, pairs or even ace high.
Many players would pass on this spot because of how texture the flop is.
But the thing is, is that an aggressive player will have a much wider range that consist of more than just the hands that make up the scary draws on that board texture.
This is what we're getting "thin" value from.
Making thin calls is the same idea as making this value bets.
You are making a call with a hand such as 2nd or 3rd pair, or even ace high.
I've called all-in shoves on a dry flop with ace high verses some players because of how aggressive they are.
What is so sick about these calls except for the fact that I was able to make them ; is the fact that my call was for value - they had a much worse who is the best heads up poker player than I did.
I'm not trying to say that you should be making hero calls with ace high every time the situation presents itself.
What I am saying though is to analyze the situation and if the aggressor's line doesn't see more sense and he makes an odd river bet, than a thin call might be in order.
You who is the best heads up poker player have to have "A" high either - I've made thin calls as light as "J" high knowing my opponent was capable of showing up with worse and turning his hand into a bluff.
Summary of How to Play HU Poker Verses an Aggressive Opponent Playing versus an aggressive player can become frustrating, tilting even.
The most important thing you can do is to remain calm, analyze the situation and come up with a strategy to overcome your specific opponent.
You'll find that by doing this and coming up with minor adjustments on the fly that you can tame even the most aggressive of players.

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Heads Up Poker: Top 7 Strategies To Use During End Games
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Of all the different ways to play poker, most players tend to agree that heads up is the one segment where the skill is emphasized the most, especially in deep-stacked HU cash games.
The heads-up game is less about cards you're dealt and much more about how you play those cards and how you adjust to your opponents' tendencies and style of play.
Moreover, in allyou will end up playing most of your hands heads-up, thus leaving yourself vulnerable in the hangover casino game spot is like shooting yourself in the foot — there is no way to be a winning poker player without mastering heads up poker strategy.
These things also make heads up probably the hardest segment of the game to truly master, making it a real challenge.
However, for those ready to put in the required work and really apply themselves to studying, the available at Upswing Poker offers everything you could possibly need to succeed — and more.
As far as credentials are who is the best heads up poker player, Polk has been one of the most successful nosebleeds heads-up players for years, battling it out with the likes of Sauce123 and Jungleman, and coming out on top.
An important thing to who is the best heads up poker player going into the Heads-up Master course, however, is that there is no magic formula for becoming a HU master overnight.
So if you considering what you can find inside, let me review this course so that you could make your decision!
Introduction The introductory video prepares players for what's ahead of them, which is well over 20 hours of intense poker lessons.
Polk tries to briefly break down the course, explaining things that will be covered in the vides to come: creating and assigning ranges, a breakdown of combos, and examples of hands, both staged and actual ones from his own database.
From the getgo, Doug emphasizes the importance of the hands-on approach to really make most out of this course, i.
Although the course is one of the longest, if not the longest available on Upswing, it isn't nearly enough to cover all the intricacies of heads up play.
Polk also introduces the game-tree idea, the one which he's been successfully applying to his own game and which has helped him become the player he is today.
Over the duration of the course, Polk often refers to different game-trees to analyze certain spots in the game, so it is definitely a good idea to listen to the introduction who is the best heads up poker player understand where he is coming from and what type of analysis to expect moving ahead.
Preflop Play The course begins with the series of videos covering the preflop play.
Right at the onset, Polk emphasizes that this particular part will not be the focus of the course because postflop play is much more important in heads up.
Despite the fact, the preflop play section is still rather extensive and covers a wide array of situations.
Small blind play RFI The segment begins with several videos devoted to small blind play.
Polk begins with who is the best heads up poker player a case against limping.
Although limping instead of raising when in the small blind can be an effective strategy in short stack games such asin deeper games, it can be too complex to implement, because it requires you to have a perfect balance between strong and weak hands.
So, instead of trying to tackle the particular subject, he dismisses it for the purposes of this course and continues with the raise approach RFI.
Doug suggests varying your raise size based on your opponent and also changing your range accordingly.
In general, sizes discussed in the videos go anywhere from 2.
The theoretical discussion is accompanied by some concrete examples from his own database, where he finds different hands to explain the concepts and get his ideas across.
Big Blind Play The segment covering the big blind play is somewhat more extensive, including five videos overall.
Polk never fails to mention how playing from the big blind will always be tricky because we're bound to lose some equity by being out of position and we need to compensate for this using various strategies that he proceeds to present.
The first aspect covered in this particular segment is the play in limped pots, i.
In general, Polk always advocates for a more aggressive approach to these spots because aggression can be this web page good way to overcome the positional disadvantage.
The idea is to often raise when faced with a limp and use a size that will deny your opponent equity and put them in a lot of tough spots.
Of course, all of this is accompanied by solid math, percentages, and in-depth explanations that back this theory learn more here prove that it actually works.
Next three videos deal with a more common situation, i.
He explains how he was among the first players to really expand his BB defend ranges, which was one of the reasons for his overall success in heads up.
There is nothing wrong with having a very wide defend range against min-raises; in fact, the math supports this approach.
As raises get bigger, you need to adjust your BB range accordingly.
For less-experienced HU players, the range of hands Polk suggests as suitable defends or 3-bets can be somewhat surprising because see more is very wide.
Once again, this refers back to the idea of playing as many hands as you can, as long as numbers support it and you can do it profitably.
One interesting hand dissected in the video is playing 56s and its playability as 3-bet against differently sized opens.
Once again, he goes back to talk about the inherent disadvantage of being out of position but emphasizes how taking over the initiative will help compensate for this disadvantage a lot.
This segment also wraps up with some actual examples from the database, looking at various interesting spots and how they actually work out against real, high-level opponents.
Additionally, all math discussed in this part of the course is available for download so you can always have it handy.
Of course, this is an important segment of play, although 4-bets aren't as complex as these ranges are usually quite heavy on the value side.
The first thing covered is playing from the small blind when faced with a 3-bet.
Polk discusses some general concepts and how certain hands are much better suited to be included in your calling range instead of 4-betting.
In general, hands that can call profitably aren't great 4-bet hands.
He also emphasizes that there isn't too much reason to slow-play your big pairs in today's games and while you can occasionally mix things up by just calling with Aces or Kings, other big pockets like Queens, Jacks, and Tens, should be 4-bet link much 100% of the time.
In terms of 4-bet the of gambling walker, Polk suggests you should spread them over more hands instead of just picking one hand like A5s to always use as 4-bet.
This protects your perceived range and makes it harder for your opponents to play against you and also helps you make sure you aren't going crazy with 4-bets.
Once again, your ranges shouldn't be set in stone and should change depending on the opponent you're playing; i.
When playing from the big blind and facing a 4-bet, things can become a bit trickier.
Doug explains how it is pretty much impossible to give exact default ranges here and this particular segment of the game has much more to do with how your opponent plays, what his general tendencies are, how often he 3-bets, etc.
Another big thing to look at in these spots is the sizing used by your opponent.
If their 4-bets are on the bigger side, this lets you get away with many more folds profitably.
Postflop Play After the section on the preflop play, the course moves on to a more comprehensive postflop play section.
As announced in the introduction, the course focuses more on the play after the flop as it is more significant and also more complex than the preflop part.
The first couple of videos give a rundown of important aspects that will be covered in the lessons to come, also explaining Polk's poker background and the way he came up with the strategies that will be presented.
This is where he explains a bit more about the whole game-tree concept, how he came to think in this particular way and how it helped him understand the way in which heads up poker should actually be played, trying who is the best heads up poker player always stay on top of your game across all various segments of the tree.
The second video in the introductory part deals with some general concepts, especially the overall importance of aggression and barreling with high frequency.
He explains two major approaches used in modern games, emphasizing the one where our flop c-bet frequency is somewhat lower but with increased aggression on various turns and rivers.
He prefers this particular approach to the one that features a higher flop c-bet percentage because it provides you with an opportunity to put your opponents' in tough spots and deny them a chance to float you with their non-equity hands, knowing they'll have to deal with aggression on later streets as well.
Of course, a balanced approach is required here as well, because we don't want to get to the point where other players can turn tables on us and simply trap us with their strong hands, folding the rest.
Small Blind in Single Raised Pots Who is the best heads up poker player first segment of the course dealing with postflop play focuses on the small blind in single raised pots.
The segment begins with a video going through Doug's database instead of keeping it for the end like in previous parts and looking into different important stats and win rates.
In the video, Polk touches upon some interesting topics, such as the fact that tighter play might yield a higher win rate in general, but that doesn't necessarily mean it is the best approach to the game, as you'll be playing fewer hands.
Following this video is the one that focuses specifically on the continuation bet from the small blind in RFI posts.
Once again, he reaches after his game-tree and breaks down important things.
An interesting aspect here is his ability to have a similar win-rate like his opponents while playing with a much looser overall range.
The complex tree branches into two parts flop check and c-bet and the video proceeds to explain the intricacies of both segments.
Taking things to a next level is the video explaining 7 specific types of bluffs available to the small blind in SRP situations.
For all of these, there are concrete examples of hands and explanations, so that we are presented with fully-encompassing and detailed explanations of these ideas.
Connecting to this video are two vids dealing with value and bluff combos.
Doug tries to entice the viewer to think about hands in terms of different ranges and the number of possible combos in different spots.
Once again, everything is nicely wrapped up with hand examples from the database, bringing the point home and clearly showing how all these various concepts have their place in actual, real-life situations at the poker table.
Big Blind in SRP From the small blind, the naturally flows over to the big blind.
Doug begins by talking about the general BB strategy and concepts, never failing to mention the disadvantage of being out of position and always keeping it in mind to figure out how to compensate for this disadvantage.
An important thing discussed in this segment deals with continuation bets and how it is a good idea to lower your fold to c-bet percentage on the flop and how folding to turn bets is often the right approach.
There are multiple reasons for this, as players tend to not bet as often with air on the turn and, also, we usually won't get a chance to bet on the river after calling a turn bet, which takes away possibilities who is the best heads up poker player win a hand.
The rest of the vids is quite similar to the small blind segment, covering similar topics, but from a different perspective.
However, Polk emphasizes that the big blind play is, in general, a bit more complex, so vids in this section are usually longer and a bit more in-depth because there is more ground to cover.
For example, videos covering the turn check-raise, Polk emphasizes that turn equities usually tend to be more polarized, i.
One topic that is not too common but might be of interest in this particular section also covers the leading strategy on the turn.
Although this is a who is the best heads up poker player video, it does present some interesting ideas to think about during the play and where you can apply them.
However, there are some hands in this whole strategy that are better off as check calls, so including the lead strategy into your game-plan can be a bit tricky.
All in all, the Big Blind section is very long and in-depth and with all the different concepts covered, it stands to significantly improve your play from the big blind.
Polk goes at length to explain how we need to be calling enough probes from our opponents, making it impossible for them to probe with their weakest, no equity hands, and check with the strongest of holdings.
An important idea he tries to get across here, followed by some of his own examples, is that if you allow this situation, you're allowing your opponents to call you with pretty much any two cards from the big blind.
Other videos wrapping things up talk about river raise after calling a turn probe, how to deal with a bet on the river in a checked pot, as well as various check-raise situations across the board.
Like the rest of the lessons, these are also very elaborate and detailed, with to back them up and many examples.
Although these are important, these situations are usually not as complex due to smaller SRP.
He looks at these situations from both perspectives, i.
For the big blind, these are usually spots where they want to keep up the aggression.
The small blind player has the position in these 3-bet pots but they also need to compensate for the generally weaker range.
Polk once again goes through his hand samples, looking for spots to bring these points home.
We're presented with various groups of hands from different categories and he once again goes into details of his game-tree for situations when we're 3-betting from the big blind and get called.
These are broken into two parts, i.
Conclusion + EXTRA BONUS: Is Advanced Https://juegoenelmundo.com/the/play-the-newest-slots-online.html Mastery Worth Time and Money?
With his Advanced Heads-up Mastery Doug Polk really spills the proverbial beans, revealing some of his secrets to success and pretty much presenting us with his entire game-plan and approach to heads up.
It is very uncommon for players to do this as most courses tend to offer bits and pieces but still hold back on some details.
A nice thing about the whole course is the fact Polk is very forthcoming about this from the get-go.
Take your time with it, watch particular videos as many times as you feel necessary, but make sure you get to the bottom line of every covered concept and really understand it.
Take the course the right way and results will follow almost without a fail!
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A complete hand-by-hand analysis of heads-up championship play against the best players in the world shows how to beat opponents at heads-up poker


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Dan “Jungleman” Cates is one of the best heads-up poker players in the world. Under his online poker name of “Jungleman12”, he has made more than $10.


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Playing versus an aggressive opponent heads up is extremely annoying.
These players like to constantly apply pressure by raising, 3-betting and pulling off plays like check-raises or bluffs.
These players just don't give us a break.
Many players, myself included, tend to react to this in a negative way.
Instead of trying to figure out a strategy to overcome this opponent, we will be counterproductive in our actions.
An action I've been guilty of taking and I'm sure I'm not alone is becoming frustrated or tilted.
Often times my first response once I reached this point is to fight fire with fire - or aggression with aggression.
The problem with this more often than not is that it is blind aggression.
We're being aggressive simply for the sake of being aggressive.
In my experience, albeit it's very short, the best approach to facing these players is to remain calm and make tiny adjustments in your strategy.
I prefer to make one adjustment at a time.
A few of these adjustments include how wide I open or defend post flop, my overall bluffing strategy and the thinness of my calls or value bets post flop.
Preflop Adjustments for Aggressive Heads Up Players The adjustment I make for aggressive players is to adapt an opposite style of play.
In other words, I will be more passive and calling station-y.
This is actually common advice to do the opposite of what the other player is doing.
The most popular example of this advice in action is versus a tight opponent.
It's often suggested that versus a tight player you loosen up and steal his or her who is the best heads up poker player since they'll only play strong hands.
All other pots are up for grabs.
I take a similar approach when playing against aggressive players.
But the thoughts behind my adjustments vary slightly depending on whether I'm opening or calling defending.
Let me explain further.
When I'm opening versus an aggressive opponent, the first question I ask myself is, "can I call a 3-bet?
I have to expect that he'll 3-bet me often.
If I can't continue to a 3-bet, I'll generally fold my hand or in other words, I'll narrow my opening range.
My range will only include hands I can 4-bet and call 5-bets with or defend to 3-bets with.
All of these hands should more or click here be for value.
So my "thought" behind my action here is more or less based on his aggressive tendency.
Defending opens, on the other hand, I actually look at what I perceive my opponent's opening range to be.
I know if my opponent is aggressive, he's likely to be loose too this is heads up after all.
So, my opponent's range will have a lot of "air" or "bluffs" in it.
My strategy for countering this is to have a wider defending range.
I'm going to defend a lot with raggedy aces, my medium kings and queens.
Again, this is all from a value perspective.
I'm defending with a wider range, but it's still narrower than what I perceive his opening range to be.
Bluff Adjustments for Aggressive Players The bluff adjustment that I make is to avoid bluffing with a high frequency - if I choose to bluff at all.
My reasoning simply boils down to what I outlined previously.
Most of my actions versus an aggressive player are going to be for value.
If I can't withstand a check-raise, 3-bet or shove, then I shouldn't be doing anything that can provoke that action.
I realize that probably sounds extremely passive casino of world even fishy.
But https://juegoenelmundo.com/the/lake-of-the-torches-casino-entertainment.html me out.
To me, it doesn't make a lot of sense to c-bet a flop if you know that 9 times out of 10 you're going to get check-raised or shoved on.
Most times, because c-bets are bluffs a large portion of the time, you're going to have to fold.
That adds up to a lot of money only to give up.
So instead, I choose to avoid it altogether and come up with an alternative strategy.
Either I'll go who is the best heads up poker player a delayed c-bet c-bet the turn or just check behind since I should expect to have showdown value a majority of the time.
Versus some aggressive players, you might be able to get away with an occasional bluff in the form of a check-raise, c-bet on a super dry board or something to that effect.
As with anything poker related, it's player dependent.
At least it was for me.
A "thin" value bet is making a bet with a hand like second or third pair.
The bet is for "value" because you expect worse to call.
It's thin because there isn't much worse that can call you.
For example, say you have KT on an A-J-T-4-2 board.
You can make a small bet here and get value from a pair of 9s or worse or even king high.
Another good example would be KT on a Th-9h-6c-5h-2d board.
This board is pretty gross with a flush draw, straight draw and a few two pair combos.
But you can still make a bet here and get value from worse tens, pairs or even who is the best heads up poker player high.
Many players would pass on this spot because of how texture the flop is.
But the thing is, is that an aggressive player will have a much wider range that consist of more than just the hands that make up the scary draws on that board texture.
This is what we're getting "thin" value from.
Making thin calls is the same idea as making this value bets.
You are making a call with a hand such as 2nd or 3rd pair, or even ace high.
I've called all-in shoves on a dry flop with ace high verses some players because of how aggressive who is the best heads up poker player are.
What is so sick about these calls except for the fact that I was able to make them ; is the fact that my call was for value - they had a much worse hand than I go here />I'm not trying to say that you should be making hero calls with ace high every time the situation presents itself.
What I am saying though is to analyze the situation and if the aggressor's line doesn't make sense and he makes an odd river bet, than a thin call might be in order.
You don't have to have "A" high either - I've made thin calls as light as "J" high knowing my opponent was capable of showing up with worse and turning his hand into a bluff.
Summary of How to Play HU Poker Verses an Aggressive Opponent Playing versus an aggressive player can become frustrating, tilting even.
The most important thing you can do is to remain calm, analyze the situation and come up with a strategy to overcome your specific opponent.
You'll find that by doing this and coming up with minor adjustments on the fly that you can tame even the most aggressive of players.

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When playing one vs one in poker, you can be sure about one thing, and that is action.
It is the most challenging, action-packed and honoring game format poker has to offer.
Heads up poker is comparable to boxing, if you beat your opponents consistently, you become the champ, gain glory and most people would never want to involve themselfes fighting with you.
But, if you are a noob and play against an experienced heads up pro, you will feel like a punch-bag being boxed into north, east, west and south given his superior experience and agility.
If you want to play like a pro, and beat your opponent into all directons, continue reading this page.
One type of strategy, or style of playing poker, might work well against one kind of opponent, but you will get difficulties against a different kind of player because your strategy became ineffective.
And precisely this is what is the tricky part to master in heads-up poker.
Whether you play heads up in sit and gos or cash games, this strategy guide will help you in each as we are going to cover the details of both game dynamics in a detailed manner.
First, we are going further into the matter on how to play deep stack heads up, which is more beneficial for cash games, and then we cover short stack heads up strategy which is more useful for the HU SNG player.
Click on the image to see which sizes you should use when open-raising and fights casino the hit stage which hands to limp and to fold.
So, in the image below you see a 100% range, of which each combination is marked with a different colour.
These different colours are used to signalise which play is optimal for the given hand.
I used Piosolver to create the ranges you can see in the image above you.
Piosolver is a GTO Solver which helps you finding optimial pre-flop ranges and betting frequencies for poker, and i strongly advice every serious poker player to make use of it.
As you can who is the best heads up poker player, you should play 90% of your hands in the small blind with a mixed strategy.
You limp some hands 22%fold your weakest hands 10% and open raise to 2bb 58% of your hands and mix in some check this out open raises with a tiny range of 10%.
And, as you also will be in the big blind, i will show you a GTO range for that position too.
So, now you should know how to play a heads up pre-flop with a stacksize of 40bb and more.
But how do we play post flop in a heads up who is the best heads up poker player super wide ranges?
Let me give you some rules, which you need to stick by if you want success in heads ups.
Play super wide pre-flop Follow charts 2.
Given the wide ranges you should value bet much lighter than in regular games 4.
Play dynamic and adjust to who is the best heads up poker player opponents tendencies 5.
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